Subscribe | Sign In

Please note: Prints of photos taken at Daytona International Speedway are not available for purchase, due to licensing restrictions.

Daytona: Racing History
Date: 6/30/2010 Album ID: 1032032
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 >>

Even before it was Daytona Beach, our area has long been known for exciting, high speed racing. In the early 1900s, daring drivers set speed records on our packed beaches. Since 1959, the greatest auto races on Earth have taken place at Daytona International Speedway, making famous names like Petty and Earnhardt.

We hope you enjoy this one-of-a-kind cruise down memory lane.

Check back for more as we continue to add more photos from our archives.

Alexander Winton sped down Ormond Beach in  the Bullet No 2 at more than 68 miles per hour in 1903. Today this car is in the Smithsonian Institution.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
W.K. Vanderbilt, in the cockpit of car No. 1, set a land speed record of 92 miles per hour in the Flying Mile on Ormond Beach in his Mercedes. The event was commemorated by this 1904 picture which also featured the Ross steam car.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Charles Schmidt strikes a serious pose behind the wheel of his wedge-shaped 1904 Packard Gray Wolf
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Fred Marriott, at the wheel, and the Stanley brothers display the Stanley Steamer nicknamed Rocket, one of the most celebrated beach speed cars. Marriott sped more than 127 mph.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Barney Oldfield with silent film star Mabel Normand on Ormond Beach in 1907.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Barney Oldfield prepares for a beach run in 1907, cigar at the ready.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
A Stanley Steamer nicknamed Rocket disintegrated in 1907 when it crashed. Luckily, driver Fred Marriott escaped with his life.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Major Seagrave is carried by crew and spectators after driving his Sunbeam to the amazing speed of 203.78 miles per hour on the World's Most Famous Beach March 29, 1927.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
After its record run in 1927 the Sunbeam was packed into a huge wooden crate for shipment back to England, proud team members wrote of its accomplishments on the side of the packing crate.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Ray Keech, who drove the Triplex to a land speed record on Daytona Beach in 1928.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Stutz Black Hawk crewmen chat with a nattily-attired flagman in 1928.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Frank Lockhart, a fast young Californian.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
The ghost white Black Hawk, turbochargers whining in full song, speeds down the sand-packed Daytona Beach in 1928.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Rescuers tend to Frank Lockhart after his Stutz Black Hawk swerved slightly into soft sand at more than 200 miles per hour, causing the car to flip end over end into the surf the in 1928.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Lockart's stunned wife, right, stares at his body as helpers try to revive him after a horrendous crash as he was driving the Black Hawk toward a record speed.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
In 1928 Frank Lockhart almost met his death by drowning in the ocean after his car swerved into the surf during his speed run.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Curious spectators gather around the crumpled wreckage of the Black Hawk moments after its horrendous crash which killed driver Frank Lockhart in 1928.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Campbell's Bluebird II is towed down Ocean Ave. in 1928.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Sir Malcolm Campbell poses with his Bluebird on the beach next to the Main Street Pier in the early 1930's.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
The famed Measured Mile was marked with a target and signage indicating its start and finish points. Timing and communications was in the tower at rear.
Email Page to FriendEnlarge this Photo
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 >>